Sadly, tens of thousands of stray kittens and cats are killed every year in Australian pounds and shelters.

Community Cat programs have dramatic effect in saving cats’ lives, and benefit shelter and pound staff and dogs in their care.

They also decrease wildlife predation. However, they are currently illegal in most of Australia. With your help we can change that!

Community Cat Programs involve trap, neuter and return (TNR) and cat diversion.

This describes the powerful positive impact of Community Cat programs involving trap, neuter and return (TNR) and cat diversion.  County Animal Control staff speak about the dramatic effect in saving cats’ lives, and the benefit to staff and dogs in their care.

Click here to read a detailed discussion about urban stray cats and Community Cat Programs written by our Executive Director and Chief Scientist

This hallmark study of trap, neuter and return from Australia is by our Chief Scientist, Emeritus Professor Jacquie Rand.

Click the button on the left to view books, courses, and videos on Community Cat Programs including trap, neuter, and return (TNR) and return to field (RTF).

In many states of Australia, feeding, removing (eg. for adoption) or returning a stray cat to its home location (releasing) is illegal without a permit under several pieces of legislation.

For example in Queensland, feeding and removing for adoption without a permit are illegal under the Biosecurity Act 2014, and the Land Protection Pest and Stock Route Management Act 2002

The returning or releasing a desexed cat is illegal under the above two Acts, as well as the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001.

For other states, check the wording of legislation for similar Acts and particularly the definition of a feral cat. In Queensland, cats are only defined as owned or feral, and so all urban stray cats are subject to legislation relating to feral cats. Click the button for a summary of Queensland legislation relating to urban stray cats